Category Archives: Hackathons

WNYC Radio: “Are Hackathons Worth It?”

I was recently contacted by Jeff Coltin, a journalist at WNYC Radio, who asked me to participate in a show about hackathons in NYC.

He featured a snippet from our conversation, specifically about problems that the hacker community could solve. I said (vaguely accurate transcription):

“…There are so many problems that hackathons could fix. I think some big issues at the moment in the media, things like the NSA spying scandals and stuff like that. I think one thing the tech community has slightly failed to do is to make encryption really easy. There’s a sort-of inverse relationship between simplicity and security, so the more secure an app, often the more inconvenient it is to use. So we have things like TOR, extra-long passwords (TOR slows down your connection a lot), VPNs and a lot of very secure services are incompatible with mainstream services. So this level of security and privacy that users want or need is just so inconvenient to achieve its really up to the hacker community to make them much easier to use…”

There have been efforts such as Cryptocat but its adoption rate still needs to grow. HTTPS would probably be the best example of seamless encryption but this often fails when people either ignore or are at loss as to what to do when HTTPS certificates are flagged as invalid by the browser.

Cryptography is an incredibly tough field of Computer Science, so creating reliably secure apps is hard. Educating oneself about this can require a fairly super-human effort and I have a lot of respect for people who contribute modules in this field to PyPI. I’m hoping to start the Crypto course on Coursera once I have some more free time, but beating the security-simplicity inverse relationship I mentioned is certainly easier said than done.